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to the syrians after the fall of the regime, because syria is not like libya. libya, at least the had resources, their own resources sources. syria has nothing except human beings. syria, the capital is one of the old as capitals in the world. this is why if syria -- they need international support. the only way to invest in syria in the future, by building strong internationally. build a strong the national education system. this is the only way you can invest in syrians. this is why syria has to have a long-term plan to recover. syria needs at least $60 billion to recover. with all the destruction that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen
senator mccain will be talking about syria very shortly. do either of you have any thoughts on that? >> i'm coming back >> senators talking about the passage of the russian trade bill, the vote on the floor of the senate a short while ago was 92-4. a look -- the senate continues in session with a vote coming up likely this afternoon, possible vote on the -- we had bep told there was a news conference happening on c-span. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator leeber and senator graham and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines an
on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his unusual prescience congressman royce also foreseen many of the developments we witnessed of late in the midd
," secrets from inside syria. a defector says the world has reason to fear chemical weapons there. >> we are getting chilling details of the deadly arsenal amassed by the assad regime. it is tuesday, december 11. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning. i'm paula faris. >> and i'm rob nelson. in a moment, what that one-time insider from syria's chemical weapons program is saying now. if you weren't nervous about the situation before, after listening to this guy, plenty of reason for the world to be nervous what's going on inside syria. but also this half hour, the ultimate sacrifice. the member of the navy s.e.a.l. team 6 killed while freeing an american doctor from the taliban has been identified. we'll find out more about this fallen hero. >>> tom hanks is standing up for heroes. how the hollywood star is helping an army staff sergeant who just returned from afghanistan. >> very cool story. it was a prank in the best sense of the word. >>> and later, beyonce scores a $50 million deal. a sweet payday from a soft drink company. all the details coming up. >> keep read
. whether the u.s. enters the war in syria appears to be up to the dictator bashar al-assad. on monday, david martin reported orte the assad regime had given orders to prepare chemical weapons for possible use to put down the revolt that has been raging in that country for more than a year and a half. oesident obama said the use of these weapons of mass bestruction would be totally unacceptable. well, tonight, david has new intelligence to report, and we have three stories on the breaking news in syria. we'll start with martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: u.s. intelligence so far has not detected any emgns syria is loading chemical weapons on to aircraft, but defense secretary panetta said it appears the embattled assad regime is preparing to do just that. >> there is no question that we remain very concerned, very thecerned that as the opposition advances, in particular on hemascus, that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. ing eporter: monitoring of syrian basis like this one has picked up evidence engineers have loaded the chemicals which combine to form
. since 1962, the state has been highly centralized. the state to maintain control of everything in syria even if you permit to apply for a open a store. you have to check first with security forces. people in syria have to do this very well with almost no funding or very little funding. they also have to operate in abnormal circumstances. there is aleppo the city and also the periphery. they make up the province. all of the periphery has been liberated. when i was in aleppo i missed the hustle and bustle of the city. the first thing i did their was i was hosted by the revolutionary transition. they come together into what they can to fill this void. we took a tour of the city. most of the shops where closed down. some were not. i wanted to find out that was trying to function as a transitional government structure. to be honest with you, i am using a lot though as a case in point. to be honest, i thought i was going to meet with simple people. the conflict has not yet come to an end. we were pleasantly surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more specific than we thought. they
. >> reporter: but kerrie is not totally in sync with obama, and he has had limited intervention in syria, something the froms has resisted. kerry has built deep relationships with many foreign leaders? there are very few people in our country with greater experience over a longer period of time in foreign policy than senator kerry. >> i want to bring in jessica yellin live from the white house. i covered kerr ney 2004 when he was running for president and he was successfully caricatured as someone who was out of touch. give us a behind-the-scenes look at who he is and how he relates to people. >> reporter: well, senator kerry is a statesman, a man who has been working in washington for so many years that it is easy to paint a caricature of him that way. he is a man who has developed a relationship with president obama which is what's meaningful today and here at the white hou house. he is, as kate pointed out, was dispatched by the president not just two times or a number of times during foreign sort of mini crises, but very, very delicate situations and he has successfully eased the way
, and he's warned there will be consequences if syria crosses that red line. let's get to kathry catherine he live in washington. what do we know about this video? i can't get confirmation from anyone. >> reporter: we're being told there's no independent evidence the syrian regime has used chemical weapons, but over the weekend video uploaded to the weapon claimed to show the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. this fire allegedly producing toxic smoke after tank was unloaded by a syrian jet over rebel-held territory. another video which could not be authenticated claimed to show protective er gear confiscated y opposition forgeses and the syrians continue to issue reassurances they won't use chemical weapons on their own people. >> shepard: it's my understanding the u.s. is about to label one of those groups a terrorist organization. >> reporter: the rebel group is blamed for more than 40 suicide bombings in syria in the last year alone including an attack at the military intelligence headquarters in damascus that killed 55 and injured about 400 in may. the group uses foreign
people and nows that ha chemical weapon. now big is syria's president to our national security. tony shaffer is here next with his thoughts. he is meant to bring joy at christmas time. this is an that is stirring up trouble instead. controversy coming up. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and share something... ♪ ♪ ...or you can get out there with your friends and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. and also to build my career. so i'm not about to always let my frequent bladder urges, or the worry my pipes might leak get in the way of my busy lifestyle. that's why i take care, with vesicare. once-daily vesicare can help control your bladder muscle and is proven to treat overactive bladder with sympts of frequent urges and leaks day and night. if you have certain stomach or glaucoma problems, or trouble emptying your bladder, do not take vesicare. vesicare may cause allergic reactions that may be serious. if you experience swellin
the morning talking about syria. the regime with one of the large stockpiles of chemical weapons in the world and biological weapons. a man who has slaughtered 40,000 as some people and clearly is capable of slaughtering many, many more. and i certainly learned a lot from these individuals who are sitting here. one thing i learned just the other day which i was aware of actually from the board is that since world war ii in the least has seen more weapons of mass destruction attacks than any other place on earth. just to go through the list here which may or may not be aware of, egyptians use toggle weapons against yemen between 1963 and 1967. in 1986 the iraqis used chemical weapons against iranians and it is reported that iranians use chemical weapons against iraqis. in 1987 as a chemical weapons against chad. and, of course, as most of you remember, saddam hussein used mustard gas against the kurds. and those of the years when the middle east was stable. think about that. that was when stability brought. well, now we're in the middle of the great arab revolt. the great arab revolt means tha
developments in the growing crisis in syria. u.n. envoy calling for a transitional government run the country in order to end the conflict. russia's foreign minister mixon grimmer marks of such a plan actually working, saying that it still necessary to reach a peaceful solution. leland vittert has more on this. reporter: the russian foreign minister said that he feared that syria could turn into a bloody chaos that there was not some kind of negotiated settlement. many looking at the video that we see every day now coming out of syria. syria is already in a bloody chaos. more than 40,000 people killed. so far in this uprising. the death toll continues to rise every day. the rebels are now starting to gain momentum a little bit. pushing into damascus, some of the other larger cities. at the same time, the regime is growing more desperate and shelling of civilian areas and those kinds of things for the only lasswell might be the russians, who at some point could break away from this and getting their own traction. president bashir max as he is not leaving. the violence continues and we are at a
involved. >> right. we also have a crisis brewing in syria with the assad regime growing increasingly desperate. intelligence reports indicate that a chemical attack against his own people could be imminent. even russia, syria's most powerful ally, is alarmed. their foreign minister met yesterday with secretary hillary clinton discussing the possibility of a syria without assad in power. >> wow. >> this morning rebels have declared damascus's airport a military target, warning civilians and airlines not to approach it. >> richard, that's what we're looking at. we're looking at russia to see when russia finally gives up on assad. if they are, in fact, coming close, it's over. he's done. >> that's the beginning of the end. and i think that's finally in play. brahimi who preceded kofi annan trying to do a diplomatic process finally, i think, has something to work with. it's the possibility of the threat that the syrian regime might turn to chemical munitions, and the russians realize that would be the equivalent of jumping and that their long-term equities. the russians realize that woul
speak out on behalf of the a 16-year-old killed in yemen, born in denver. >> in other news from syria, reports have emerged that the young syrian filmmaker was killed on monday in the city of hams. he appeared on the show in december. at the time be as that we only use his first bid for security reasons. >> what i saw in the last week, it is starting to turn into almost a civil war. they are enforcing the locals to form an armed resistance to the regime forces. >> for more we go to charles glass, award winning broadcaster. he returned from syria last month. >> these massacres are a clear indication of how urgent it is to find -- to force both sides in the conflict, the opposition and regime, to negotiate a settlement, which would ultimately mean a change in regime, but certainly a transition period in an absence of that, you have the russian army government, the saudis, the guitarist, the that states, turkey, farming the opposition, which will only inflame the civil war. more massacres will then take place. >> we continue with our look back at 2012. to get a copy of today's show, go t
" says this about the situation in syria -- it is the front page of "the new york times" this morning, and they say this -- peter baker and bryan gordon write in "the new york times" -- then, also we are doing a segment on syria taking a deeper dive into this issue on sunday here on the "washington journal ." moving on to the situation in israel. five nations some men envoys of israel. also, some other headlines for you. "the baltimore sun" -- next to that, president obama suggests a revamp of the russia nuke deal. in "of the wall street journal" -- a "new york times" headline -- much about the phone call which occurred some months ago remains shrouded in mystery. it highlights the level of his anxiety about the current crop of candidates. we are talking about the proposal by house republicans to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff put out yesterday from the speaker's office with signatures from the rest of the leadership team. christine, a democratic caller, what do you think about it? you are on the air. caller: i have to agree with a couple of other people that called in. we have had
hillary clinton says if syria uses chemical weapons against its own people the u.s. will act. there are reports indicating syria has been moving chemical weapons in the last couple of days. secretary clinton says their use would be a red line for the united states. >>> the parents of an 8-year-old georgia girl say they want to warn other parents after their daughter was bit by a dolphin at seaworld and they caught it on tape. take a look. sfwhoo. >> the girl's father post this on youtube saying seaworld is trivializing what happened but seaworld said employees and health professionals attended to the girl immediately. and that they are taking the situation seriously. >>> remember this picture that went viral last week. a new york city police officer giving a shoeless man a pair of boots in times square took the money out of his own pocket. the "new york times" said it tracked the man down and found him last night and he didn't have shoes on again. jeffrey hillman said he hid the shoes because they are worth a lot of money and he thinks his life is at risk. he's grateful for w
in syria or from any militia group loyal to the syrian government and that the captors were talking openly about their loyalty to the government. he said his captors executed at least one of this rebel escorts on the spot at the time they were taken. they were freed yesterday. the center for american progress is naming lawrence summers as a distinguished senior fellow. he will work with the economic policy team. he took office as the 27 president of harvard university. he is director of a center for business and government. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. [video clip] >> i did not conduct a survey of gun owners. i found that very often the reaction -- your way of thinking before and after you have a gun is very different. any law-abiding gun owner realizes when he has a gun that is a huge responsibility. if use this weapon wrongly, you can dig yourself into legal trouble and cause unnecessary misery and death even to people .ou didn't intend to do harm to it makes you very careful. it would make people more careful if that all had to pass some kind of a test before
aggressive or the stance of an aggressive china. kerry has to look at the civil war in syria and figure out how to contain the damage. if the military loses control over chemical weapons, there could be greater refugee problems and could destabilize jordan and lebanon and to spillover potentially into israel. that will be the first thing. that is much more of a job for a diplomat to ease tensions and to get people to not respond to provocations that the defense secretary. host: first question is gil rahm westchester, new york. caller: i like to know your opinion on mr. kerry's nomination for secretary of state after he called our soldiers killers and murderers and rapists. guest:well, he has been a politician for a very long time and i think over the years he has said and some thisome thing. i am sure in 2004 he regretted some of his affiliations. kerry was never as radical as some of the other members, but he has been in the public eye for more than 40 years and has a very long track record. recently, he was someone known in washington for giving third, fourth, 6, and seven chances to bash
in liberating libya. we are now thinking about deploying defense missiles on the turkish border with syria. we're putting forces into the western pacific because of north korea, they may launch a missile as a test object. we have china, which could have a defense establishment on budgetary terms larger than our own with capabilities that we may not be able to match. we are the only one that is "x," but that may not be enough. host: right-wing radical on twitter says, we agree to bring the troops home and spending money here. leave the world be. republican caller. caller: i agree with right-wing radical. bring the troops home. i specifically wanted to ask about the militarization of our police department and our sheriffs departments. i am calling from fredericksburg, virginia. we have a swat teams that are running drones. what about homeland security and all this apparatus we are using? isn't that just switching from the cost of the military to homeland security, which president bush did not want? how was the war financed? i know that george bush did not credit on the baseline pentagon budget,
grown to more than 500,000, all across the middle east. and inside syria, rebels captured a second major military base near the northern city of aleppo. new details have emerged from south africa on the health of former president nelson mandela. the government announced today that military doctors are treating him for a recurring lung infection. mandela is 94 years old. he's been hospitalized since saturday, but officials said he is responding to treatment. an investigation of paying pro football players for causing injuries took a sharp new turn today. the man appointed to hear appeals, former nfl commissioner paul tagliabue, voided the suspensions of four current and former new orleans saints. tagliabue said actions by team coaches and others had contaminated the case. he did agree that three of the players should be fined. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: cairo is the scene of mass rallies again tonight. demonstrators on both sides of the upcoming referendum are on the streets of the capital. their refrain was "bread, freedom and sharia" or islam
changed? i just came from a long trip, russia, syria, israel, egypt. here's what happens in what i call a hyperconnected world when you're a columnist now. when i started, i was a reporter in beirut in 1982. all i wanted to do was tell americans something they didn't know from beirut, okay? well, that was pretty easy because, you know, there was no cnn back then. you couldn't really follow the news. there were no bloggers. now when i go abroad to write a column, i just wrote from egypt this morning, what's in my head is i'm not looking to tell just americans something they don't know about egypt, still pretty easy. what i aspire to now is actually to tell egyptians something they don't know about their own country. in other words, my job has changed because i know i have readers there. i have bloggers there. i'm so connected to that audience that it isn't enough for me anymore in the old days just to tell people in chicago something new about egypt. i've now got to tell people in egypt something new about egypt if i want to keep my job. >> exactly. and we ask these questions and make th
just back from the persian gulf and you have a keen interest in what's happening in syria. we've taken this step toward recognition behind our allies and to some criticism, the rebel forces are telling our colleague, richard engel, too little, too late, and, in fact, the terror designation of several groups there is counterproductive, because they are the best fighters. what is your take on how we are trying to find a middle ground here? >> there is this notion we should have participated at the table in discussions. i'm not talking about militarily much earlier, they are frustrated with us as well. here's been the issue, so the best-funded, best-equipped, and best-capable fighters have been from the front or other extremist groups. so they have globed on to these opposition groups and been very effective tool and very effective units for them in fighting. and that's been a problem. so we have seen over time that the proliferation of these groups across a whole segment of opposition groups that six months ago we would have said had no extremists in them. that's the huge problem that we
of a mutual effort to address the threats of hezbollah patrons iran and syria. by simply designating hezbollah as a terrorist organization and stating the obvious, the europeans could deprive hezbollah to access to millions of dollars in european banks and other financial institutions while making an enormous contribution to regional stability, saving hundreds of lives that would otherwise be hezbollah's future victims. again, i strongly support this kelly resolution and i urge all of my colleagues to do the same. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida reserves. the gentleman from new york, mr. engel is recognized. mr. engel: i rise in strong support of h.res. 834 and yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he wishes to consume. mr. engel: thank you. this urges the members of -- the nations of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and impose sanctions on it. we know from our experiences with iran that sanctio
with humanitarian aid, and working for a transition to a syria that is free of the regime. today, i want to make it absolutely clear to assad the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is an would be totally unacceptable. if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. [applause] we simply cannot allow the 26 -- the 21st century to the darkened by the weapons of the 20th century. over the last four years, we make critical investments in our production programs. energy, state, and we have been increasing funding and sustaining it. even as we make some very tough fiscal choices, we will keep investing in these programs. our national security depends on it. after all, even with all of your success, the thousands of missiles destroyed, bombers and submarines eliminated, the warheads deactivated, we are nowhere near done. by a long shot. you all know this. there is still much too much material. being stored without enough protection. there are still terrorists and criminal gangs doing everything they can to get their hands on
is the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan and bahrain and syria. the agenda has remained narrow as a means of focusing the issue of our principal concern, namely proliferation. the second school of thought suggests the agenda is broader and perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the debt -- disagreements of the nuclear issue. as far as i can tell, that has never been resolved. when an issue remains not result, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of the bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we always talk about the year of this or the year of that. we always think of it as not having enough time. yet there is always more this issue seems a degree of time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before. i suspect there is a bilateral conversation that it will attend the discussion. said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty about what we hope to achieve. i would be interested to hear what yo
the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan or by iran or syria. they say the agenda has to remain narrow as a means of focusing issue on our principal concern which is proliferation. the second school of thought suggests if the agenda is broader, perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the agreements on the nuclear issue. that particular concept has never been resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered as a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we talk about years of decision. i think we have more time on this issue. we always think of the issue as not having enough time and being urgent but somehow there is always more time. in 2008, this issue was important and it had an urgency but it has time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before also in 2009. if there is a bilateral discussion [inaudible] >> marina, ray said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty a
that latest on syria. in afghanistan, the pentagon has tracked a slight rise in afghan attacks. we showed you a report yesterday in "usa today" that deaths in afghanistan have gone down. we have about a minute left here. let me just read another tweet -- let me give you the latest headlines on health care. here's u.s. news section of the wall street journal. then yesterday, six states were approved by the centers for medicaid and medicare services on track under federal guidelines to operate in an exchange during open enrollment next october apparen. up next, we are going to turn our attention to the fiscal cliff with jim doyle and get a business perspective on that. later on, looking at the different aspects of the fiscal cliff talks. a closer look at domestic spending. we will be right back. >> ♪ [video clip] >> give it to him hard. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or a
controlling guns one thing or another i take people in syria, iran, and some of these other countries that try to get up against the government and a because the guns are outlawed so they're just helpless and that's what's going to happen to this country i'm afraid. host: dave do you expect to see a -- the discussion on gun control is going to be ramped up but will there be anything different done after this shooting that wasn't done after the columbine shooting do you think? guest: i'm hopeful. i think it's one of these situations where columbine really got the ball rolling. but it wasn't nearly enough. i mean, the mountain was way too high. but we've had year after year of a series of these tragedies where we never dealt again because i think that was a defeatist attitude like if we couldn't do it after columbine people felt we never will. but this situation last week was so awful and coming on the heels of so many others i think we have sort of it feels like we've reached a breaking point where people have said ok this time we're really going to do it. and sometimes it sort of takes in soci
on in this piece in "usa today" -- harder choices loom. syria being a more intractable problem than libya. a tougher stance with china through the a share rebalancing . is now the time to me sure a firmer line does not lead to another war. writer a lot that the lays out in his piece. grace from alabama, good morning. caller: good morning. i have a question about benghazi. nobody has said anything like this. it seems to me, the president would get on the phone with the president of the other country and say, "please help us save our people." the in the u.s. help support the efforts of the people to get rid of gaddafi? why did obama or hillary clinton get on the phone and call the president of libya and say, "you owe us. san whenever you have to save our people." i believe the local forces went in after it was over and our people were dead. to didn't somebody jawbone, get them in there to help? host: you can talk about any topic you like. joel florida, what is on your mind. caller: you were talking about afghanistan. one of the main reasons we are over there is to keep the poppy plants grow
in syria, possibly even today in that devastating area. certainly perfect partner at the united nations for four years in diligent, excellent, astute, thoughtful, and patriotic service has been susan e. rice, a daughter of washington, d.c., and parents who loved america. a graduate of stanford university where, of course, she earned department honors and university distinction. became a harry s. truman scholar, phi beta kappa, and rhodes scholarship. certainly a beginning that did not warrant the kind of personal attacks that we have seen. i think we should leave politics and campaigns and won or lost races to november 6, 2012. for you cannot debate a political and presidential campaign around a patriotic public servant. if there is a nomination for ambassador rice, the senate has every right to advise and consent and the votes need to be taken on up and down. i can assure you that if she is nominated by the president, she will serve this nation well. as she has done in the past. i know her well as the assistant secretary for african affairs under the clinton administration. dealing wit
.s. and russian senior diplomats will meet today with the united nations peace envoy for syria in an attempt to end the civil war there. this comes as pentagon sources tell nbc news there is intelligence suggesting the syrian government has loaded sarin gas into aerial bombs and awaiting command from president assad for its use. >>> and from our parade of papers, "the san francisco chronicle," american jazz legend dave brubeck died just short of his 92nd birthday. he redefined american jazz in the 1950s and '60s, and he was a jazz pop star of sorts. "take five" became the first jazz recording to sell over a million copies. it made jazz popular in the united states. dave brubeck dying yesterday. >> a great musician. >> little-known fact, the guy that played stand-up bass for him the last ten years, mike allen. >> is that right? >> nobody knew that. allen. yes, he plays it and spins that thing around. >> oh, i love when he does that, slaps the back of it. >> he also, for a year and a half, when the stray cats went over to london. >> mike ailen? >> stand-up bassist for the stray cats. >> the bo
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)